Michael Craig

Senior Lecturer

I am interested in memory and related functions in human health and disease. My research investigates a variety of questions including: How does memory change as we grow older and in Alzheimer's Disease? How are new memories processed in the brain? How do different post-learning conditions (e.g. quiet rest, being busy) affect the early processing and transformation of new memories? How do we find our way in new and familiar environments? Are there differences in memory functions between hearing and deaf individuals? To do this, I use a range of behavioural and electrophysiological methods, including electroencephalogram (EEG) brain activity recording, sensitive memory measures, neuropsychological tests, and virtual reality.

The ultimate goals of my work are to provide new insights into memory in human health and disease in order to develop new diagnostic tools / measures of disease progression (e.g. for Alzheimer’s Disease) and safe, low-cost interventions to support those with and without memory problems to live as healthy and independently as possible, for as long as possible.

Michael Craig

Public health, behavioural science and new media technologies.

Publications

2014

Autobiographical Thinking Interferes with Episodic Memory Consolidation

Journal

PLOS ONE

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2018

Rest-related consolidation protects the fine detail of new memories

Journal

Nature Scientific Reports

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2018

Rest on it: Awake quiescence facilitates insight

Journal

Cortex

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2019

Rapid improvement of cognitive maps in the awake state

Journal

Hippocampus

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2021

A study on episodic memory reconsolidation that tells us more about consolidation

Journal

Learning & Memory

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2021

Memory and Forgetting

Journal

Encyclopedia of Behavioral Neuroscience

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2022

Single ‘dose’ of correct information is insufficient to provide long-term protection against COVID-19 misinformation.

Journal

PrePrint

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